Your Ancestors Have Power

22/02/2011 § Leave a comment

Many people enjoy thinking about their ancestors. Now new research published in the European Journal of Social Psychology suggests it’s not just pleasurable, it may actually make you more clever. Peter Fischer studied what happened when people thought about their forefathers just before taking an intelligence test and found that those who thought about the past members of their families were more likely to do well in the tests. He believes people are more motivated to succeed when they think about their ancestors.

BBC Health Check 24/01/11 Listen here.

RELATED LINKS

Professor Peter Fischer, Social Psychology, University of Graz (www.uni-graz.at)

BBC WHYS: Do ancestors hold us back?

31/01/2011 § 1 Comment

Should we continue to worship the memory of our forefathers or is it an expensive waste of time? Devotion to ancestors is widespread across the African continent where many people consult the shrines of spiritual mediums as a way of seeking advice from those that have died.

Religious leaders in the continent are alarmed by the rise in ancestral worship and claim it has no place in today’s society.

 

How much do ancestors influence your life? Does their memory inspire or scare you? Do you have ancestral duties yourself? Are your ancestors holding you back? Or giving you spiritual guidance?

Read comments on this and listen to World Have Your Say here.

Ugandan spiritual medium sitting by a sacred tree

The beginning of the program:

Presenter: “Abdul, [22yrs old male in the studio] do you identify youself as Somalian or British?”
-…Somalian.
-Somalian?
“To what extent are you Somalian?”
-Ummm, as a person of Somalia, but I grew up in United Kingdom.
-Where were you born?
-Saudi Arabia.
-In Saudi Arabia… – and have you been to Somalia?
-Um yeh, I’ve been twice.
-You’ve been twice… When you go and come back, do you feel a sense of connectedness in a way you havent felt it before or does it just feel like you’ve gone to visit a certain place, that you have a heritage with but are coming back home, to the United Kingdom.
-Ummm. Nah I feel like when i go back i feel like I’ve had a connection because you meet a lot of your family, you see your culture and your heritage first hand and you see what, you know, what good life people are living there, because the media makes it seem that – you know – that Somalia is a terrible place.
-Is there a good life in Somalia? presenter asks very doubtfully.
-Yeh, there is.
-What did you see?
-People living healthy. Ah, you know, even people that dont have that much to eat – the community supports them – where I went. So it shows that its not just that, you know, third world county where its just refugee camps everywhere. People are living quite well. And you get to meet a LOT of your family with is very special.
-Strong sense of community.
-Yeh
-“Sumsa! [18 year old girl in the studio] I can see you smiling!” – the interviewer says chuckling. “Do you feel well percieved by other British young people? – Your peers, here in the United Kingdom… as a, as a young Somali?’
-Like do I feel connected, do you mean?
-Yes do you feel connected?
– Yes!
-Like do you feel accepted?
-Yes
-You do feel accepted?
-Yes, I do.
Listen to hear the rest.

…”I get  a sense right now as i speak to the young Somalis right now…  there appears to be a gap between the two generations, a different way of thinking and perception I hear the young people, and I could be wrong, saying that well that was then, this is now, that was them, this is us. Would you say you’re getting a similar sence ther in Manisota?”….

This is also interesting because you get to witness a conversation between two radio stations and two studios across the Pacific, the vast space between them have never been so obvious to me. It also becomes obvious how much rests on the attractiveness of the new homeland culture to the individual immigrant.

The young people in the UK studio; 22 born in Saudi Arabia, 21 born in Italy, 23 born in Somalia moved to Holland at the age of 2, 18 born in UK. How can these people own their identity so well – speak with ethnic accents!?

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with ancestors at Lost and Found.

%d bloggers like this: